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Welcome to the GAC website:
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GIBB ARCHAEOLOGICAL CONSULTING

This site is always in development and we encourage you to visit often as updates are imminent.  If you have any comments or suggestions, please email us at: Email GAC


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Calendar of Events

Wagon Making Grist Mill Cemetery Research & Restoration
Redware Ceramics Wine Cellars Rural Cheese Factories
Graves, Death, and Dying School Houses Mark Twain's Summer Home
Port Tobacco Late Archaic in the Chesapeake  

If you are interested in any of the above presentations, please contact us

Discovering the 'Lost' Town of Port Tobacco :
History and Archaeology of a 300-Year Old Town

The Port Tobacco Archaeological Project searched for the houses, shops, and warehouses of this one-time Charles County seat of government, discovering sites from the 1700s and 1800s, as well as thousand-year-old Native American sites. Dr. James Gibb provides an illustrated talk about the project, its findings, and the future of this quiet little town in Southern Maryland.

Sponsor: To be arranged
Date:

Location:

Contact:

Making Cheese: From Kitchen to International Corporation, 1850-1900

During the 1850s and 1860s, thousands of small cheese factories popped up all over New England, New York, the Upper Midwest, and parts of Canada. Cheddaring had all but left the farm kitchen by the 1870s and butter making followed a few decades later. This illustrated talk demonstrates how early factories made cheddar, and then recounts the transformation of rural cheese-making from kitchen to cooperative dairy to family-owned conglomerates to international corporations, with the railroads playing a leading role in the final shift. It's a story about an Anglo-American staple, but also of environmental degradation, the destructive power of monopolies, and the abandonment of large portions of central New York State.

Sponsor: Culinary Historians of Washington (CHoW)
Date:

October 14, 2012; 2:30-4:30 PM

Location:

Bethesda, MD

Contact: Katy Hayes at: artemiscooks@gmail.comt

Exploring Four Centuries Over Four Years:
The Port Tobacco Archaeological Experience

Four years (2007 – 2010) of archaeological investigation of the town of Port Tobacco (1720s - 1890s) has produced an assortment of benefits, not least of which has been the creation of the Charles County Archaeological Society, the identity of which is wholly independent of the project. The Port Tobacco Archaeological Project team of professional and avocational archaeologists has produced numerous technical reports, conference papers, public presentations, and a few professional publications. In this illustrated presentation, Jim Gibb will summarize the team’s many and varied findings, highlighting new research questions spawned by the work, and recommend future directions for archaeological investigation and museum / historic site development at Port Tobacco.

Sponsor: Archeological Society of Maryland
Date:

October 20, 2012; day-long conference

Location:

La Plata United Methodist Church, La Plata, MD

Contact: JamesGGibb@verizon.net

Archaeology and the Citizen-Scientist:
A New Program at the Smithsonian Environmental Research Center

For several decades, the Smithsonian Institution has operated a world class n environmental research center on the banks of the Rhode River in southern Anne Arundel County. SERC has now added archaeology to the spate of environmental sciences with a pilot study combines students, interns, all sorts of volunteers, and professional scientists in the study of human-environment interaction on the 2600-acre preserve. Jim Gibb will provide an illustrated talk on a pilot study of Sellman’s Connection, a 500-acre tract that is now part of the SERC campus, exploring how a single family (the Sellmans, 1729-1917) adapted to the environment and, in so doing, changed it, prompting a cycle of changes and readaptations for which the project team has been recovering archaeological evidence.

Sponsor: Upper Patuxent Archeology Group
Date:

7:30-9:00 PM

Location:

Ellicott City, MD

Contact: JamesGGibb@verizon.net

Indians of the Chesapeake Bay Region:
Three-credit course offered at Stevenson University

Indians in Maryland claim great antiquity. Archaeologists agree, documenting at least 12,000 years of aboriginal occupation of the greater Chesapeake region. This course surveys the extensive archaeological evidence, introducing students to the theories, methods, and findings of archaeological research. Students will develop analytical skills and knowledge of both the ancient past and the troubled present of local Native Americans.

Sponsor: Stevenson University, History Department
Date:

To be arranged

Location:

Greenspring Campus, Greenspring Valley Road, Stevenson , MD

Contact: JamesGGibb@verizon.net

Run of the Mill:
History and Archaeology of Maryland Mills

Mills, driven by water through rough wooden gears and wide leather belts, fed Marylanders from the middle of the eighteenth century to the turn of the twentieth. They supported Baltimore’s successful bid for industrial prominence in the Mid-Atlantic, and they linked the entire state to international markets. Dr. James Gibb explores the history and architecture of Maryland mills and demonstrates how archaeological investigations have revealed remarkable differences in technology among the state’s mills.

Sponsor:  
Date:

 

Location:

 

Contact:  

Ethics in Archaeology:
A Workshop for the Certified Archeological Technician Program

Dr. James G. Gibb conducts a workshop on ethics in archaeological practice. The workshop is a requirement for those enrolled in the Archeological Society of Maryland's Certified Archeological Technician Program.

Sponsor: To Be Arranged
Date:

Last held at ASM field session, May 26, 2012

Location:

 

Contact:  

Rural Maryland Schoolhouses, 1865-1925

Sometimes maligned, often romanticized, the one–room schoolhouse played a pivotal role in the history of public education in Maryland. The State Board of Education––established by the new state constitution of 1864––mandated schoolhouse designs and even interior furnishings, along with teacher certification and a statewide curriculum. For nearly a half-century, counties across the state erected these simple buildings with entry halls and belfries, blackboards and factory–made desks, playgrounds and ‘necessaries,’ pot–bellied stoves and raised platforms for the teachers’ desks. Widespread adoption of the automobile, however, led to consolidation in the 1920s, and one–room school buildings––once among the most common public buildings on the Maryland landscape––disappeared, replaced by the multi–room structures (including the Rosenwald plans for African–American children) and specialized faculty that have characterized public school education to this day.

Archaeologist and historian Dr. James G. Gibb explores the roots of Maryland’s modern school system with an approximately forty–minute illustrated talk about rural schoolhouses. He draws examples from around the state, including an unusual hexagonal school, state–mandated designs of the 1865–1920 period, and Rosenwald schools, and includes illustrations of school artifacts recovered from archaeological excavations at school sites. The presentation is appropriate for adults and older children. Audiences are encouraged not only to ask questions, but also to discuss their community’s educational history and surviving historic school buildings.

Sponsor: To Be Arranged
Date:

 

Location:

 

Contact:  

Life and Death
in Early Colonial Maryland

This illustrated presentation explores life in 17th–century Maryland, from the village at St. Mary’s City to the dispersed settlements along the shores and tributaries of the Chesapeake Bay. The approximately 50–minute talk features two plantation sites on the lower Patuxent River, including plans of the buildings, pictures of artifacts, and a discussion of the human burials excavated at one of the sites. This presentation is suitable for school children and adults. Images of human remains can be omitted on request.

Sponsor: To Be Arranged
Date:

 

Location:

 

Contact:  

Remembrances:
Researching & Restoring Cemeteries

Can a society that ignores its cemeteries successfully preserve its other historical resources? Probably not, but federal and state statutes provide little protection for cemeteries as historic resources. Such efforts necessarily will be spawn by local groups, with little or no guidance or leadership provided by government agencies. This illustrated talk offers some guidelines and insights into cemetery research and restoration based in real-world experiences, largely undertaken in collaboration with Grave Concerns, Inc., and its principal, Scott D. Lawrence.

Sponsor: To Be Arranged
Date:

 

Location:

Contact:

 

 

 

History was last made
on this site August 22, 2012



 
 

 

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